Informed Consent  & Concussion Education For Teams Attending a Canadian Championship

You are being asked to read and sign this form if you wish to participate in a Canadian Championship. If you are under the age of majority (18) a parent/guardian must also read and sign the form below. 

Informed Consent

ELEMENTS OF RISK:

Softball activities involve certain elements of risk. Injuries may occur while participating in these activities. The following includes but is not limited to, examples of the types of injury which may result during an activity: fracture, laceration, sprain, strain, contusion, concussion, etc.

The risk of sustaining these types of injuries result from the nature of the activity and can occur without any fault of either the athlete or the team, the organization, its employees/agents or the facility where the activity is taking place. By choosing to take part in this activity, you are accepting the risk that you/your athlete may be injured.

The chance of injury occurring can be reduced by carefully following instructions at all times while engaged in the activity. If you choose to participate, you must understand that you bear the responsibility for any injury that might occur.

Please indicate if your athlete has been diagnosed as having any medical conditions and provide pertinent details to ensure a safe and positive environment.

If your athlete is presently diagnosed with a concussion by a medical doctor/nurse practitioner, that was sustained outside of team physical activity, the Concussion Report must be completed before the athlete returns to practice/games or other competitions. Request the form from your Provincial/Territorial administrator or from www.softball.ca.

Concussion Education 

 WHAT IS A CONCUSSION?
A concussion is a brain injury that can’t be seen on x-rays, CT or MRI scans. It affects the way an athlete thinks and can cause a variety of symptoms.

WHAT CAUSES A CONCUSSION?
Any blow to the head, face or neck, or somewhere else on the body that causes a sudden jarring of the head may cause a concussion. Examples include getting body-checked in hockey or hitting one’s head on the floor in gym class.

WHEN SHOULD I SUSPECT A CONCUSSION?
A concussion should be suspected in any athlete who sustains a significant impact to the head, face, neck, or body and reports ANY symptoms or demonstrates ANY visual signs of a concussion. A concussion should also be suspected if an athlete reports ANY concussion symptoms to one of their peers, parents, teachers, or coaches or if anyone witnesses an athlete exhibiting ANY of the visual signs of concussion. Some athletes will develop symptoms immediately while others will develop delayed symptoms (beginning 24-48 hours after the injury).

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF A CONCUSSION?
A person does not need to be knocked out (lose consciousness) to have had a concussion. Common symptoms include:

  • Headaches or head pressure
  • Easily upset or angered
  • Dizziness
  • Sadness
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Nervousness or anxiety
  • Blurred or fuzzy vision
  • Feeling more emotional
  • Sensitivity to light or sound
  • Sleeping more or sleeping less
  • Balance problems
  • Having a hard time falling asleep
  • Feeling tired or having no energy
  • Difficulty working on a computer
  • Not thinking clearly
  • Difficulty reading
  • Feeling slowed down
  • Difficulty learning new information

 
WHAT ARE THE VISUAL SIGNS OF A CONCUSSION?
Visual signs of a concussion may include:

  • Lying motionless on the playing surface
  • A blank or vacant stare
  • Slow to get up after a direct or indirect hit to the head
  • Balance, gait difficulties, motor incoordination, stumbling, slow labored movements
  • Disorientation or confusion or inability to respond appropriately to questions
  • Facial injury after head trauma
  • Clutching head

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I SUSPECT A CONCUSSION?
If any athlete is suspected of sustaining a concussion during sports they should be immediately removed from play. Any athlete who is suspected of having sustained a concussion during sports must not be allowed to return to the same game or practice.

It is important that ALL athletes with a suspected concussion undergo medical assessment by a medical doctor or nurse practitioner, as soon as possible. It is also important that ALL athletes with a suspected concussion receive written medical clearance from a medical doctor or nurse practitioner before returning to sport activities.

WHEN CAN THE ATHLETE RETURN TO SCHOOL AND SPORTS?
It is important that all athletes diagnosed with a concussion follow a step-wise return to school and sports-related activities that includes the following Return-to-School and Return-to-Sport Strategies. It is important that youth and adult student-athletes return to full-time school activities before progressing to stage 5 and 6 of the Return-to-Sport Strategy. 

Return-to-School Strategy
RtSchool FR
 Sport-Specific Return-to-Sport Strategy
RTSport
 HOW LONG WILL IT TAKE FOR THE ATHLETE TO RECOVER?
Most athletes who sustain a concussion will make a complete recovery within 1-2 weeks while most youth athletes will recover within 1-4 weeks. Approximately 15-30% of patients will experience persistent symptoms (>2 weeks for adults; >4 weeks for youth) that may require additional medical assessment and management.

HOW CAN I HELP PREVENT CONCUSSIONS AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES?
Concussion prevention, recognition, and management require athletes to follow the rules and regulations of their sport, respect their opponents, avoid head contact, and report suspected concussions.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT CONCUSSIONS PLEASE VISIT:

Parachute Canada: www.parachutecanada.org/concussion

 

Informed Consent

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